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New York Market Week Fall/Winter 2017: Liberty Fairs

We’re back again with more trade show coverage. This time, it’s from the floor of Liberty Fairs at Pier 94. If you missed yesterday’s coverage, you can find it here.

Rancourt

Rancourt marches onward with mostly their core footwear, including their handsewn moccasins, and more boots. New to their lineup of sneakers will be some cotton canvas versions at a lower pricepoint.


American Trench

American Trench continues sheathing feet with some of the nicest American-made socks out there. Cashmere for those with particularly cold feet, loop terry gym socks, super slubby socks, and fair isle all make their way into the collection. They’re also covering the other extremities with cashmere knit gloves and beanies.


Railcar Fine Goods

Indigo on indigo jeans, more chambray shirting and Railcar Fine Goods bandannas. It’s more or less the usual fare at the RFG booth. Perhaps the heaviest splash was their new  23oz. denim. It’s a lot, especially considering the double waistband. They even reinforced the pocket bags with another layer of canvas because they know that the pocket bags will blow before the denim does. Because of the amount of work (not to mention broken needles), it’ll be a steep price point, well above $300. Also in the mix is their black on black denim, made in both their usual five pocket jean as well as a new ‘Type 1.5’ denim jacket.

Also, there’s a special proprietary fabric of which we were not allowed to take photos. Keep an eye out for that.


Old Hands

Old Hands returns, this time adding a little bit of contrast to their range of well-built jackets. Standard jeans, vintage 30’s style sweaters, and pleated selvedge chinos, all in more relaxed fits.


Tellason

The big news for Tellason is what they’re calling Tellason Stock. It’s a full line of jeans that will retail for just $99. Still made in San Francisco. Still made with White Oak Cone Mills raw denim. Sure, they’ve knocked down the price because of the lighter pocket bags, non-selvedge denim, and lighter leather patch. But, for dudes who’ve yet to slip their legs into a pair of crispy raw denim jeans, the price point will surely get more people into the game. It’ll come in a few of their most popular fits as well as their denim jacket which will retail for much less than their selvedge version. They’re also introducing an entirely new fit called the Blubaugh. In collaboration with photographer Todd Blubaugh, the Blubaugh is a mid rise relaxed taper fit with extra belt loops. Ideal for bikers.


Blluemade

With their first showing at the trade shows, Blluemade presented their fine Belgian linen garments. It’s a palette of natural linen and indigo in a relaxed silhouettes and simple designs.


Koromo

If you can imagine Kapital with a straight face you’ve got a good idea of Japanese boro-brand Koromo. Reversible jackets, reversible vests, and, like they do every season, there’s a crazy boro jacket that would give even Rare Weaves a serious run for their money.


Shockoe Atelier

Shockoe is moving away from a wholesale directed model. Instead, the Richmond-based denim brand is producing in small seasonal capsules of four to six pieces dropped frequently throughout the year. This way, consumers will be able to purchase directly what they’re designing rather than waiting for what may or may not be picked up by larger retailers. That’s a long way to say, not much new at the Shockoe tent! We did, however, get our hands on their 26% EME blend fabric from Candiani. That might sound like a crazy amount of stretch, but EME is actually more for strength than it is for stretch. The fabric feels quite taut and stiff. You’ll see it in jackets and jeans.


Knickerbocker Mfg. Co.

If you want to start a bowling league with some proper uniforms, the crew at Knickerbocker will gladly outfit you. There’s been more corduroy in recent seasons and I’m glad to see it on their simple two-pocket jackets. Also, check out that vintage L.L. Bean/Duxbak-looking jacket.


Dickies 1922

In high school, I had a Dickies work jacket because all the other punk kids had them. I wanted to be cool, so I got one too. Their work jacket brings back memories, and now I have that longing for one again. Thanks, Dickies 1922.

Check back in tomorrow for the last round of our New York trade show coverage from Capsule’s trade show floor as well as the Viberg showroom.