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Centerpiece Teapots – Five Plus One

Whether you are having a relaxing brunch with friends or just want a warm beverage before bed, you can’t go wrong with a hot cup of tea. And while you could serve it by the cup, doesn’t it look more attractive in a decorative teapot? Whether you make a pot of your favorite tea for your friends and family or just for yourself, we’ve got Five Plus One options below of how you can serve it in style.

1) Maia Ming Designs: Kaya Teapot

Centerpiece-Teapots---Five-Plus-One 1) Maia Ming Designs: Kaya Teapot

Maia Ming Designs’ Kaya Teapot brings the quality of a stoneware with the soft touch of silicon. While the idea of wrapping such a great material in a synthetic might not appeal to everyone, it’s hard to deny that the resulting look is both unique and, somehow, captivating — especially when paired with the unique contours of this pot. While available in a wide range of colors, the deep, inky blue tones of this version just seem right.

Available for $79 from Dwell.

2) Norm Architects: Kettle Teapot

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Stoneware and ceramics might be durable and attractive, but glassware is great in its own right. Norm Architects Kettle Teapot and its clear design not only has clean, modern lines but has the added benefit of letting you see your tea while it’s brewing. Just pop in your favorite tea leaves, or better yet some blooming flower tea, and watch it brew to perfection.

Available for $100CAD from Vancouver Special.

3) Skagerak: Edge Teapot

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While all of the teapots on this list are great in their own right, Skagerak’s Edge Teapot seems to fit the Heddels aesthetic to a tea. Constructed from a burnt orange terracotta with a teak handle and brass hardware, this teapot seems to hit all the marks: classic style, ability to patina over time, and a quality that leaves nothing to be desired. Complete the set with some matching cups or use this pot with the ones you already have — either way, you can’t go wrong.

Available for $169 from Connox.

4) Rikumo: Yakishime Teapot

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Rikumo‘s Yakishime Teapot is made, as the implies, using the Japanese yakishime method. This lets the natural beauty of the material, both in color and texture, shine through the piece. It features a hollow handle, shallow bowl, and spout to allow for easy pouring without risking burning your hand. This piece is made in Japan, which ensures an admiration for the Japanese ceramics traditions used to make this pot.

Available for $68 from Rikumo.

5) Hasami: Porcelain Teapot

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It’s great to see Hasami becoming more of a household name, but for the uninitiated their Porcelain Teapot would make a great entry piece. It features clean, modern lines that make it perfect as part of a set or as an accent piece. That said, it is part of a modular, interlocking set, so whether you get them together or pick-up another piece (possibly even in a different finish) at a later date, they’ll look great together.

Available for $75 from Imogene + Willie.

Plus One – Ayame Bullock: Black Mudcloth Teapot

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I admit it: I’m a sucker for Ayame Bullock ceramics. Their aesthetic is beautiful, the construction solid, and the fact that they are made in my neck of the woods doesn’t make me any less of a fan. This model is a deep black color with a white pattern inspired by East African mudcloth, and a wood and brass handle that contrasts with the rest of the pot wonderfully. It’s not the cheapest piece around, but it’s made by hand as has all the details you’d expect at its price point.

Available for $350 from Glasswing.